yoga, exercise

Exercise and Oral Health: YES—There is a Connection

For many of us the New Year is a time to make resolutions and pledge to exercise and live a healthier lifestyle.  We join a gym, sign up for a spin class, check out the latest Yoga trends, purchase some new athletic wear, or just make a commitment to amping up our daily physical activity….Why? Because we know we can do a better job at staying fit and healthy, and a new year provides the perfect opportunity to recommit to this goal.

2019 New Guidelines from the Department of Health & Human Services

The new guidelines state that even five minutes of exercise is beneficial., Previous guidelines recommended physical activity take place in at least 10 minutes increments. The point is to encourage movement of any kind.

The Department of Health & Human Services noted that in the decade since the first set of guidelines were released, research has emerged showing the expansive benefits of exercise, including:

  •     Decreased risk of cancer: Studies show it helps prevent 8 types of cancer:( bladder,* breast, colon, endometrium,* esophagus,* kidney,* stomach,* and lung*)
  •     Reduced risk of anxiety and depression
  •     Boosting one’s cognitive function and sleep, reduces the risk of dementia* (including Alzheimer’s disease*)
  •     Reduced risk of fall-related injuries and excessive weight gain
  •     Regulating weight gain in preschoolers
  •     Protecting against gestational diabetes and postpartum depression in pregnant women and new mothers
  •     Decreasing the risk of falls among older people.1https://www.peacefuldumpling.com/yoga-dental-health

Physical Health and Oral Health

So, these new guidelines are great and provide us with new insight on the health benefits of physical activity, but how does that impact our oral health. To reiterate what DrTungs has been promoting for many years, our overall physical health directly contributes to our oral health. These systems are intricately bound and dependent on each other for total health.  They are never mutually exclusive, so whenever you pay attention to your oral health, your whole body benefits; and conversely, when you up your game on your physical health, your oral health also reaps rewards.

Oral Health Benefits of Physical Activity

There are many ways to boost your oral health through a variety of physical activities. In general, reducing your BMI (Body Mass Index) and risk for obesity correlates directly with a lower risk for periodontal disease.  Any regular physical activity program you adopt will provide this major benefit.

As an avid ambassador of Ayurvedic practices, DrTungs is a HUGE Yoga fan, so we wanted to share a list of benefits directly associated with this healthy form of exercise:

  • Reduces stress. Clenching and grinding of the teeth causes them to chip, crack, and wear down over time. This can lead to sensitivity, nerve damage, receding gums, tooth decay, and even tooth loss.
  • Improves posture. Poor posture can cause the head to fall forward, pushing the jaw out and affecting the alignment of the teeth. Left unaided, this can result in jaw issues, such as temporomandibular joint disorder (TMJ). Side effects of TMJ include chronic headaches, pain when opening the jaw, uneven tooth wear, cracked teeth, and pain when chewing or swallowing.
  • increases salivation. When saliva production slows, and the mouth is allowed to go dry, bacteria flourish. Chronic dry mouth can lead to problems such as a buildup of plaque, tooth decay, and gum disease. That’s why it’s so important we keep our saliva flowing!2https://www.hhs.gov/fitness/be-active/physical-activity-guidelines-for-americans/index.html

 Of course, as with any new health regimens you may consider for 2019, we recommend you consult with your physician first. And, always do your research to understand any potential risks.

Lastly, don’t forget to maintain your daily oral health routine with DrTungs. Check out all of our excellent natural products designed to maximize your oral health.  Liberate your smile all year long!

 

References   [ + ]

1. https://www.peacefuldumpling.com/yoga-dental-health
2. https://www.hhs.gov/fitness/be-active/physical-activity-guidelines-for-americans/index.html

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